Court denies judgement, preliminary injunction in Detroit Free Press case pending discovery info

By Jim Newell
Review Staff Writer
Orion Township received news on Monday that the judge in its case against the Detroit Free Press denied a partial summary judgement and preliminary injunction request from the Free Press.
“This is really good news. Essentially the judge is asking for discovery,” Supervisor Chris Barnett said at the Board of Trustees budget workshop on Monday. “This is not a victory, but it is good news because the judge isn’t buying their story.”
At issue is the Free Press weekly publication Select, a mix of editorial content, advertising and coupons, that arrives in a plastic bag along driveways on a weekly basis and is delivered free of charge to households, including about 2,500 homes in Orion Township since 2012.
Barnett said he’s received hundreds of complaints from residents who don’t want Select delivered to their homes, and that the Free Press opt-out option isn’t working.
The township issued two littering tickets to the Free Press on April 20 and May 26 of this year. The Free Press then filed a $5 million lawsuit against the township.
The Free Press had requested a partial summary judgement and a preliminary injunction motion during a hearing on Sept. 22 before Judge George Caram Steeh, U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Michigan Southern Division, according to a document provided to The Lake Orion Review.
In the court document, the Free Press’ request was denied without prejudice. The document also states:
“At the hearing (Sept. 22), the plaintiff’s counsel represented that it only delivered Select to residents who had requested delivery of the publication. Prior to issuing its ruling here, the court would like to be fully informed as to the process for determining which residents received Select, and how plaintiff enforced its opt-out program for those residents notifying the plaintiff that they wished to cease delivery of Select.
“Because these facts and others that may be the proper subject of discovery, will enlighten this court’s decision on the issue of liability and injunctive relief, plaintiff’s motion for partial summary judgment and for a preliminary injunction is denied without prejudice pending further factual development,” the ruling stated.
While the case will continue, Barnett said the township will not give up in its position to support its residents, and the that the township is the defendant in the case.
“If the Free Press would like to drop their case, we would welcome that,” Barnett said. “But it doesn’t appear they are going too.”

3 Responses to "Court denies judgement, preliminary injunction in Detroit Free Press case pending discovery info"

  1. Eric   October 28, 2016 at 2:58 pm

    Best statement ,plaintiff’s counsel represented that it only delivered Select to residents who had requested delivery of the publication. Can I testify? #NeverFreePressAgain

    Reply
  2. Sandra Kuhlmann   November 3, 2016 at 2:36 pm

    I’d really like to know how much of the Township’s money has been spent on this lawsuit so far. “We” couldn’t take on Pulte because of the price tag!

    Reply
  3. David   April 15, 2017 at 4:52 am

    You guys should go to your citizens in gated private communities who have private roads and talk to them about how the Free Press doesn’t even try to stop this trespass. When you complain to the Free Press, and give them WHO is doing it, magicly a new person starts leaving the trash. You guys should contact the FEDS and get them to go after the Free Press under RICO. They can control their delivery people. They have the LEGAL responsibility to do a professional job and put in place methods to stop this rampant illegal activity, and they DO NOT.

    Reply

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